SUM 2 Project, Indonesia

SUM II provides funding and technical support to civil society groups (non-government and community-based organisations) so that they can participate better in the response to HIV and district level in Indonesia.

SUM stands for Scaling Up of MARPs participation. APMG is working in a consortium led by TRG Inc (Training Resources Group). Other members of the consortium include RTI International and the Burnet Institute. SUM II provides funding and technical support to civil society groups (non-government and community-based organisations) so that they can participate better in the response to HIV and district level in Indonesia. The main aim is to ensure that the people and communities most affected by HIV and most at-risk of acquiring HIV get access to the range of programs and services they need to avoid acquiring HIV if they do not have it, or can live a full, health and productive life if they are living with HIV. APMG’s primary role in SUM II is to provide technical assistance in the areas of:

  • Organisational growth – helping CBOs to put in place the strategies, policies, procedures and systems they need in order to grow successfully
  • Technical assistance to the local Capacity Development organisations: SUM contracts with three local OD agencies who provide organisational capacity development assistance to the funded CBOs. APMG supports these three organisations with coaching, mentoring and technical assistance
  • Technical assistance in implementation. APMG is assisting CBOs to improve the quality and reach of their interventions, particularly in the areas of access to meaningful knowledge of HIV status and working to bridge supply and demand for service for people from populations most affected by HIV

SUM II Project is moving into its fourth year of implementation in September 2013. More information about the project is available at http://www.sum.or.id/

About the author

Lou McCallum's picture

Lou is a director of APMG and is based in Sydney. He has worked in the response to HIV in a variety of roles since 1983 including management of AIDS home and community programmes and was Executive Director of Australia’s national AIDS NGO. Lou has a background in paediatric nursing, nursing service management and public policy. He worked alongside friends and colleagues in the early part of Sydney’s response to HIV in the gay community, setting up volunteer emotional support and home-care programmes, providing community support in outpatient clinics and providing VCT counselling. Lou began working as an HIV and development consultant in 1998, focusing on technical assistance for national and provincial AIDS policy development, and implementation and strengthening of the civil society response to AIDS. Lou is an experienced adult learning trainer and has prepared and conducted training programs for a wide range of health and community workers. He is also a consumer health advocate and has served two terms as national chairperson of the Consumers’ Health Forum of Australia.